Moray Archery
Moray Archery

Moray Archery Centre

Open to the public at the weekends and Monday to Wednesday evenings from April to October.

All sessions must be pre-booked at least a week in advance as we do not offer a drop in service.

 

Our Archery Centre

is 2 miles south of Elgin.

On the road to Thomshill.

 

Moray Archery 

Glenlossie Road

Birnie

IV30 8SR

Indoor range

Unit 9 Perimetre Road pinefield Industrial Estate Elgin IV30 6AF

 

Opening Times

Thursday & Friday

Session 1 = 6-7pm

Session 2 = 7-8pm

Session 3 = 8-9.15pm

The English longbow, also called the Welsh longbow

The Longbow is a powerful type of medieval longbow (a tall bow for archery) about 6 ft (1.83 m) long used by the English and Welsh for hunting and as a weapon in medieval warfare. English use of longbows was effective against the French during the Hundred Years' War, particularly at the start of the war in the battles of Crécy (1346) and Poitiers (1356), and most famously at the Battle of Agincourt (1415). They became less successful after this, with longbowmen taking casualties at the Battle of Verneuil (1424), and being completely routed at the Battle of Patay (1429) when they were charged before they had set up their defensive position. The term "English" or "Welsh" longbow is a modern usage to distinguish these bows from other longbows, though in fact identical bows were used across northern and western Europe; indeed a very large proportion of yew bowstaves were imported from Spain from the fourteenth century onward, if not earlier.

The preferred material to make the longbow was yew, although ash, elm and other woods were also used.  The traditional construction of a longbow consists of drying the yew wood for 1 to 2 years, then slowly working the wood into shape, with the entire process taking up to four years. (This can be done far more quickly by working the wood down when wet, as a thinner piece of wood will dry much faster.) The bow stave is shaped into a D-section. The outer "back" of sapwood, approximately flat, follows the natural growth rings; modern bowyers often thin the sapwood. The heartwood resists compression and the outer sapwood performs better in tension. This combination in a single piece of wood (a self bow) forms a natural "laminate", somewhat similar in effect to the construction of a composite bow. Longbows will last a long time if protected with a water-resistant coating, traditionally of "wax, resin and fine tallow".


Print Print | Sitemap
© Moray Archery